WIldlife Release Support

Rehabilitated animal casualties, such as badgers, deer, foxes, otters and birds of prey may need to have a supported and monitored release. This is usually a very physical job, involving the preparation of release sites across a wide range of geographical areas and terrains. Releases tend to be most concentrated during the summer and autumn seasons, usually lasting 1-2 days. Voluntary Wildlife release support staff form an essential part of the teams put together for these specific tasks.

This again is a very physical role, involving a great deal of manual handling and covers a range of geographical areas and terrains. Working well as part of a small team is very important; as is being able to take on tasks independently under guidance.

Release sites vary according to the species being released back into the wild. When animals cannot go back to where they came from, alternative sites are considered. Careful planning and consideration is given to the release of larger mammals and birds to make sure that the areas being offered as potential release sites are appropriate. Positive land management for wildlife, habitat surveys, pre and post release monitoring, as well as creating soft release enclosures for species which need a a supported, gradual reintroduction form part of the release process.

Artificial Badger Sett

Artificial badger sett being constructed with the help of Wildlife release support volunteers. Large depression dug in ground with large piping laid out to form tunnels.
Voluntary Wildlife release support staff helped create this artificial Badger sett. Sett depth was dug out by mini digger and piping laid in place.

Bedding areas filled with straw and hay. Timbers and then metal sheets laid over bedding areas, to maintain tunnels after back filling earth.
Bedding areas filled with straw and hay. Timbers and then metal sheets laid over bedding areas, to maintain tunnels after back filling of earth.

Artificial Sett complete. Large mound of earth in a field showing one of the entrances.
Artificial Sett complete. Post release monitoring is accomplished through trap cameras and microchip monitoring.

With the Rescue and Rehabilitation process successfully completed, the Release completes the animals journey back into the wild. 

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